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Business Directory and Licensing

 

For the months of January to April 2019, Council has decided to offer all home-based businesses a discount off the regular business licensing fee as an incentive. This means that for the first four months of next year if you renew your license or obtain a license for the first time, the license will be only $50. Early next year, a business directory will be launched helping to advertise businesses in our area. The Economic Development Committee is also very interested in helping promote and grow local businesses.

 

Why do I need to license my business?

Firstly, it is the law. Anyone operating any type of business from their home must have a business license. But it also affords you other benefits. The Town Office frequently gets calls from people looking for a certain type of business in Town. If you are not licensed, we are unable to give them information about your business. As well, when the Town requires work performed or products purchased, we are only able to deal with licensed businesses.

The Town, in cooperation with the Fairview and District Chamber of Commerce and Fealty Ltd, is developing a comprehensive business directory for the area. Paying the licensing fee ensures that you will be included in this business directory. Feel free to have a look at the Business Directory work in progress here.

Licensing is also important so that we know what types and how many businesses are operating in our community as it can help us direct funds to advertising efforts or other initiatives.

 

What do I need to license my business?

Simply fill out the business license application. This lets us know a little bit about your business, like how to contact you. Once that is filled out, simply drop it off at the office.

 

Costs

The regular price for a home-based business license is $75 per year. This works out to $6.25 a month or about 20 cents a day. The licensing fee is also a business expense.

Immediate Employment Available – Lifeguard

Lifeguard – Instructor

The Town of Fairview Community Services Department is currently seeking a responsible, hard working and enthusiastic individual with a passion for Aquatics and Recreation who can ensure the ongoing safety of our patrons and to provide professional instruction in a variety of aquatic activities at the Aquatic Centre. This full-time Lifeguard/Instructor position (40 hours/week) will include a combination of set and flexible hours; some shifts may include evenings and weekends.

The Fairview Regional Aquatic Centre is in the Town of Fairview located in Northern Alberta within the Heart of the Peace Country approximately 82km SW of Peace River and 115km North of Grande Prairie. Town amenities include 10 km of paved trails systems, Local Gun Range, Arena, Aquatic Centre, Gym Facility, Skateboard Park, Splash park, ball diamonds, parks and playgrounds, golf course, ski hill, curling, bowling and local campsite. The Fairview Regional Aquatic Centre boasts a water slide, zero depth, wading pool, 25 m 5 lane lap pool and a Tarzan swing.

Compensation:
The Town of Fairview offers a competitive salary and benefit program (following successful 3-month probation period) including LAPP Pension. Salaries range from 21.94 hr – 29.57 hr based on experience and qualifications (no union dues). We offer complimentary gym membership, health benefits, ongoing leadership and development opportunities and paid recertification and training. Re-location assistance available to suitable candidate.

Qualifications:
As a key player with our team you will have the following:
• National Lifeguard Certification
• WSI or ICS Teacher/Instructor Certification
• Standard First Aid (CPR-C)
• Evidence of Clear Vulnerable Sector Search (RCMP & CFSA)
• Pool Operator Level 1 and Level 2 (preferred)
• Familiarization with Recreation Software an asset (Activenet)
• Certified Aquafit/ Fitness Instructor (or willingness to obtain)

We wish to thank all applicants for their interest; however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. This position will remain open until suitable candidate is found.

Qualified applicants are invited to apply in confidence to:
Town of Fairview
Attention: Caroline Cleave
Box 730
Fairview, AB T0H 1L0
aquatic@fairview.ca (All attachments in PDF format only please)
780-835-2812, Opt. 4

Community Action – How To Get Involved

In response to concerns raised on Social Media, administration would like to assist residents with a brief introduction to resources available to them as well as information on current legal structures in place. We hope to provide a series of informative posts to help residents of our community feel engaged, heard and able to constructively focus their efforts and concerns. Please note that as this is a very complex topic, it has been greatly simplified to fit the needs of Social Media, not all options or nuances are explored here.

Council & Residents role in our community

Council’s role in our community is one of legal power. They have the power to decide how to use municipal tax dollars to keep our community running in a healthy and safe manner. Their power is set out and restricted by the Alberta Government in the Municipal Government Act.

As residents of the community, this community is ours and we all need to work together to improve issues we see or provide services that may be needed. A large complex problem like Drug Addiction and Abuse does not have a ‘silver bullet’ solution, but there are things already in place that every resident can use to help improve life in our community. We will discuss some of these in future posts, as well as how you can get involved!

Illicit Drug Use & Addiction

The federal (Canadian) government sets the laws regarding what drugs are legal and illegal in Canada. As a federal law, this is enforced by the RCMP and other Police forces. Council does not have the authority to write bylaws regarding or restricting federal laws, except for in specific cases where the Province has allowed this. An example of this would be with the new federal Cannabis laws, the Province has allowed each municipality to decide on the topic of public consumption of Cannabis. However, it would be illegal for a Council to enact a bylaw that made cannabis illegal in their municipality. Bylaw Enforcement Officers typically do not have the authority to enforce the Controlled Drugs Act.

Controlled Drugs and Substances Act – http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-38.8/

Available Resources

The RCMP and other health and safety organizations, such as Alberta Health Services, recognizes the impacts that illicit drugs and addiction can have on a community and have put in place several resources. There are resources to address both aspects of the issue, the illegal and illicit acts performed by those who are using these drugs, as well as resources for those that realize they have a problem and are attempting to free themselves from this addiction.

Alberta Sheriffs – Safer Communities and Neighbourhoods (SCAN): http://www.scan.alberta.ca

Alberta Health Addiction and Counselling Resources: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/assets/zone/ahs-zn-north-map-brochure.pdf

Fairview Drug Awareness Coalition: https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/amh/Page2704.aspx

RCMP Crime Map (submit a tip/report): Available at https://www.fairview.ca/municipal/protective-services/

What Can I Do?

As a resident of our community, perhaps you have an idea or think something should be done in a better way. While complaining on Social Media can be therapeutic, it typically does not produce any meaningful results. If you feel strongly about an issue, try to organize a group or meet with a group that has already been established for that purpose. Have a meeting with like-minded individuals and discuss the issue and potential solutions. We hope that some of the information we have provided already can help point you in that direction.

Then, when you have a plan, reach out to local organizations that may be able to help you reach your goals. Council can hear out proposals and may be able to assist with locally-led initiatives, but typically would not lead the initiative themselves.

Funding for Local Initiatives

Alberta Health Services provides funding (discussed in Post 3) for both addiction counselling and locally led coalitions. As funding is already available through those organisations, it would be easiest to attempt to work with those organizations for needed funding.

Council and your local MLA would be another option to discuss funding with. However, please be aware that these are very limited sources of funding. For new projects and initiatives, it can be difficult to find significant sources of funding, as this would require raising taxes or cutting another service. To receive funding in this way, you often must also form an official organisation.

Fundraising using locally-led initiatives is another option. When you meet with like-minded individuals to discuss your plans and solutions, try to also discuss possible sources for raising funds. Perhaps selling locally made goods at the Farmers Market with the proceeds going to your organisation or donations from local businesses. To accept donations, you usually also must form an official organisation.

Other Ideas

As mentioned several times, Drug Abuse and Addiction is a very complex topic that many smart people have been working on for a long time. Reach out to some of these organisations and get their ideas. What works well? What did they try that didn’t work well? Where do they get their funding from?

The Community Action on Drug Abuse Prevention brochure linked below has some more guidance from Alberta Health Services about how to get a community led organisation up and running.

National Institute on Drug Abuse: https://www.drugabuse.gov/

Community Action on Drug Abuse Prevention (AHS): https://www.albertahealthservices.ca/assets/healthinfo/AddictionsSubstanceAbuse/if-com-communityaction-manual.pdf

Canadian Government list of substance abuse resources: https://www.canada.ca/en/healthcanada/services/substance-use/get-help/get-help-with-drug-abuse.html

Utility Bylaw Changes

A new utility bylaw has passed first reading. This new bylaw contains significant changes to the landlord/tenant relationship with the Town. Highlights of the bylaw changes are as follows:

  • Utility services will now only be provided in the name of the property owner. Existing accounts that are in the name of a tenant will be maintained as is, as long as they remain in good standing.
  • A property owner may request a copy of their bill to be sent to someone else (such as a property manager or a tenant). There will be a monthly charge of $2 / month if this is to be a printed copy.
  • Tenants will no longer be charged a utility account deposit.
  • When water bills become significantly overdue (three months) the water will no longer be shut off. The outstanding amount will be added to taxes and the water service will continue.
  • Property owners may still request that the water service to their property be shut off.

Please note that as this bylaw has only passed first reading, it is not in effect yet. For any concerns or comments regarding these changes please contact our office to let us know.

New Community Standards Bylaw

At the October 2 meeting of council, two new bylaws regarding bylaw enforcement were passed. The first bylaw standardizes the enforcement of bylaws and the procedures followed when a bylaw infraction is reported or observed. It also shows the penalties for all applicable bylaws.

The second bylaw is the new Community Standards bylaw. Formerly, this was known as the Nuisance bylaw. Some of the highlights of changes to this bylaw include:

  • Changed the start time of quiet hours from 11 pm to 10 pm.
  • Added information about leaving garbage bins out on the street.
  • Added information about composting.
  • Updated the entire Noise section to include specific limits on noise and more information around what is considered to be unacceptable noise.
  • Move information from the Sidewalk Snow bylaw into this bylaw.
  • Added information about outdoor lights (typically security lights) shining into other buildings.

Public Consumption of Cannabis Unlawful in Fairview

Council requested the opinion of residents on the subject of the public consumption of cannabis in Fairview. The following question was asked:

As of October 17, 2018, the Federal government has legalized cannabis. The Provincial government has been given the authority to set laws around the public consumption of cannabis.

Public smoking or vaping of cannabis in Alberta will be prohibited from any place where tobacco is restricted as well as in the following places.

On any hospital property, school property or child care facility property in or within a prescribed distance from:

  • a playground
  • a sports or playing field
  • a skateboard or bicycle park
  • a zoo
  • an outdoor theatre
  • an outdoor pool or splash pad
  • from any motor vehicles, with the exception of those being used as a temporary residence, such as a parked RV

Any cannabis retail outlets.

Municipalities have the authority to enact bylaws to restrict public consumption of cannabis further.

Regarding public consumption of cannabis, would you like to see enforced in Fairview:

  1. Just the provincial and federal regulations as shown above.
  2. Creation of a Town Bylaw that does not allow public consumption of cannabis, treating cannabis the same as alcohol.

The results of that survey are shown below:

 

Based on the responses, the recommendations of the local RCMP and the direction of many municipalities in Alberta, along with several other factors, Council enacted the bylaw shown below. The most frequently requested bylaws can be viewed here.

For more information about the Cannabis laws in Canada, Alberta and Fairview, please take a look at the following information sheet.

Notice of Decision 19-18

Take notice that the following Development Permit for the proposed use listed has been approved by the Development Officer under the provision of Land Use Bylaw #984/LUO/2012 and amendments thereto:

Permit No. 19-18
Legal Description Lot 17 Block 14 Plan 5074TR
Civic Address 10405-118 Street
Proposed Use Front deck replacement
Date of Notice of Decision July 10, 2018

Any person claiming to be affected by this decision may, under the Land Use Bylaw, appeal to the Development Appeal Board by serving written notice to the Appeal Board Secretary, P.O. Box 730, Fairview, Alberta within twenty-one (21) days after notice of the decision.

Daryl Greenhill
Development Officer

Notice of Decision 18-18

Take notice that the following Development Permit for the proposed use listed has been approved by the Development Officer under the provision of Land Use Bylaw #984/LUO/2012 and amendments thereto:

Permit No. 18-18
Legal Description Lot 29 Block 01 Plan 182 1739
Civic Address 10905-114 Street
Proposed Use Detached garage
Date of Notice of Decision July 10, 2018

Any person claiming to be affected by this decision may, under the Land Use Bylaw, appeal to the Development Appeal Board by serving written notice to the Appeal Board Secretary, P.O. Box 730, Fairview, Alberta within twenty-one (21) days after notice of the decision.

Daryl Greenhill
Development Officer

Cannabis Bylaw Amendments

The two proposed Cannabis bylaw amendments (1039/LUO/2018 and 1040/LUO/2018) have now completed third reading, which means they are now enacted as bylaws for the Town of Fairview. This allows prospective business owners to plan for cannabis legalization. The new bylaws closely match the majority of the survey results that were received.

Bill C-45, the Cannabis Act of the Federal government received royal assent on June 21, 2018. Prime Minister Trudeau announced that the effective date of the Bill would be October 17, 2018. This allows the province and municipalities time to prepare for the legalization.

 

For more information:

Bylaws and Policies – Read the new bylaws here

See the summary of the survey results here

See the summary of the survey results here for the responses where respondents answered that they were a resident of the Town of Fairview

Intermunicipal Development Plan (IDP)

What is an IDP?

An Intermunicipal Development Plan (IDP) is a plan developed jointly by two or more neighbouring municipalities to manage land use and development decision-making for an area of land in close proximity to their shared boundary. The IDP is a statutory plan, required under the Municipal Government Act (MGA). It is meant to facilitate efficient and compatible land development by addressing:

  1. Future land use and the process coordinating the review of future development proposals in the area,
  2. Environmental matters as well as social, physical or economic development matters,
  3. Co-ordination and financing of intermunicipal programs, services, facilities, and infrastructure,
  4. Procedures for conflict resolution and amending or repealing the plan, and
  5. Administrative matters related to the plan.

Who are we creating an IDP with?

The IDP is between the Town and the MD of Fairview.

Where is the IDP Area?

The IDP Area, also known as the Joint Planning Area, is adjacent to the boundary between the MD and the Town. It covers an area of approximately 28.16 km². It is represented by the white background in the map below. Some of the key features and landmarks located in the IDP Area include the Sanitary Lagoon, Cummings Lake, the Peterson Reservoir and the Fairview Municipal Airport.

Why is creating an IDP with the MD important?

Apart from being a mandatory plan required by the Province, the value of creating an IDP with the MD is that the plan will:

  • ensure that physical development occurs along the shared boundaries between the two municipalities in a coherent and orderly manner, mitigating the threat of incompatible land uses and conflicting developments;
  • provide a framework for the Town and the MD to work together on issues such as procedures for land annexation and the provision and management of shared infrastructure, resources and services (e.g., transportation, water supply, parks); and
  • foster greater collaboration between the two municipalities, both at the institutional and community level.

What is the process to develop the IDP?

There are six major stages in the plan preparation process. The key stages are outlined below, including where we are at with each:

Who does it affect?

An IDP affects stakeholders (such as provincial agencies that regulate public infrastructure located within the MD or the Town), landowners whose lands are located within the Plan Area, and anyone interested in developing within the joint planning area. The IDP document will provide landowners, stakeholders and other interested parties with the appropriate land uses and development options for their land based on the policies adopted within the plan. It is important that future development is compatible with existing residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural uses; major transportation routes; and significant environmental features and landscapes

How can I get involved?

There are several opportunities for Fairview residents, stakeholders, landowners, the public and other interested parties to participate in the IDP process. These include:

  • reviewing the newspaper Ad about the IDP in the Fairview Post (June 6 and 13, 2018)
  • completing a short online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MD136FairviewIDP
  • responding to stakeholder and landowner letters, if you receive one
  • watching out for IDP information in the next newsletter
  • reading and commenting on Facebook posts about the IDP on the Town’s Facebook page at http://facebook.com/townoffairview/
  • following project updates on this webpage
  • attending a Public Hearing on the draft IDP document when advertised (TBD)
  • asking questions, sending comments and suggestions to any of the contacts provided below

Where can I get more information?

If you have any questions, concerns, suggestions or would like to request further information about the process or content of the IDP, please contact any of the following:

Daryl Greenhill, Chief Administrative Officer at the Town of Fairview [contact]

Elise Willison or Komiete Tetteh, IDP Project Coordinators at Mackenzie Municipal Services Agency, by phone at 780-338-3862 or by email at info@mmsa.ca